Research from AT&T shows that people find inspiration on their smartphones and tablets. They believe it makes their world a better place.

More than 7-in-10 Americans (71%) say their mobile devices are digital portals to inspiration. AT&T also found 8-in-10 (80%) people saying that mobile technology facilitates inspiration. For nearly half of respondents (46%), connecting to inspiration with mobile devices is part of their daily routine.

The report is part of a national conversation AT&T calls Inspired Mobility. It’s an ongoing dialogue about how people connect with their faith and inspiration with mobile devices.

Hip hop icon and digital inspiration guru Rev. Run joined AT&T to discuss the study. He reaches 4.5 million people every day with just one tweet from his device.

“I believe inspiration can change the world,” Rev. Run said. “It gives people a much-needed lift. In our current times, this couldn’t be more important.”

The new findings show people are not just using their devices for work email, launching chickens and zapping zombies.

“It’s much more personal and enriching than that,” said Leonardo Torress, executive director, entertainment group, AT&T Diverse Markets. “They’re telling us mobility improves their lives – and the lives of others – virtually anytime and anywhere. That’s a new way to look at the power of this technology.”

The report details how people seek and share inspiration with their mobile devices:

Respondents say inspiration is a part of their mobile experience more than half the time. Even when people turn to their device for fun, information or productivity, inspiration is a part of the mix.
When seeking inspiration on mobile technology, 7-in-10 (70%) people say they access faith-based content the most, followed by inspirational stories and quotes.

More than half of women reported accessing inspiration for motivation, compared to 4-in-10 men. Nearly 6-in-10 (58%) young people (18-25) say they use mobile for inspiration as part of their daily routine.

“So think twice before you tell someone to put down their mobile device to tune into something more constructive,” said Torress.  “They could actually be busy making the world better.”